Heads Down: Is human interaction soon going to be a luxury?

by Marisa Sanchez-Dunning

Noise. iPhone 8 this, Snapchat that, Instagram stories – what the actual fuck?

The other day, I was travelling on the train back home to Leeds from Huddersfield and what I saw made me angry; ready to go mental, then all of a sudden I felt a wave of sadness and disappointment. I looked around the train, noticing an eerie silence.

  • Picture this: a train full of people sat next to each other, acknowledging nothing other than the device in their hands, scrolling through it as if they were zombies. Everyone existing together, yet somehow still feeling all alone.

    With World Mental Health day coming up, I felt I needed to write a piece on this issue that I hold so closely. Every second of every day there are people thinking about their next selfie, their next Tweet, their next filter they are going to use on their face because they feel ugly, how many likes they got on their last Instagram post and how they can improve the next one, and if what they texted that attractive human was too much or too little; what a stressful constant state of anxiety.

  • Within the last two years, we have lost many prominent people; whether it be due to their mental health, physical health, or something that simply was out of their control. George Michael, Prince, David Bowie, Chris Cornell and Chester Bennington just to name a few. In early 2017, I lost someone who unfortunately decided to take their own life, making me face mental health straight on. No more stigma, no more avoidance.

    Our mental health is precious and an important aspect of us that we sometimes forget to take care of. Whether it be the regular pressures of life that come down on us, the tragic state of our political climate, or even the economic climate; amongst the noise of life, things can all be a little too much.

    Unfortunately the next time I get on the train, my experience will probably be the same, but it doesn’t stop you, whomever is reading this, from asking the next person you see, if they’re okay.

    Let’s not take the human interaction for granted.

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